Meet Linda Sutton

We are extremely happy to have Linda Sutton as one of our Artists for our Art on a Ukulele Project. Linda is an Essex born painter, though much of her time and work is spent in Calabria, Italy. She graduated from the Royal College of Art and has since been a regular exhibitor at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition where she has been a prize winner numerous times. In 1970-71 Linda lived in Belgium where, because of her obvious talent, she was given a free studio at the Antwerp Academy, where Queen Fabiola of Belgium bought one of her paintings.

Le Nozze di Figaro, http://www.lindasutton.com/

Le Nozze di Figaro, http://www.lindasutton.com/

Linda has a large following, particularly in Cabria where she is the first non-Italian to have had an exhibition in Chiesa della Badia. This is not surprising given the influence mythology and narrative based themes have on Linda's work, drawing links to some of the best loved Italian Theatrical works and Operas - Don Giovanni, Faust, Desdemona and Rusalka are just some of the subjects she depicts. In Le Nozze di Figaro, based on the Comedic Opera by Mozart in which servants get married against the wishes of their philandering employers, teaching them a lesson in fidelity. In this work, Linda has chosen to focus on Rosina, the Countess whose husband is chasing the affections of a servant girl. Rosina is one of the more tragic characters in this comedic piece, depicted here forlorn and thoughtful. She is dressed in red, which lies in contrast to her pale blue-green skin, revealing the sense of a lost soul. This is common in Linda’s work, her characters often hold a dream-like quality, suspended in thought and contemplation.

The dreaminess of her work is directly linked to her own relationship to painting. Linda has said that she first delved into the mythological worlds of her paintings when she was very sick as a child, using fantasy as escapism and to strengthen her to rise above hardship. Stylistically there is a delicacy and romanticism to the work, adding a personal perspective to well-known epic, historical narratives.

On her work Linda says ‘Not how much information is on a surface but how much reaction evoked from that surface is important to me. More than just the admiration of a painting but an experience, or a remembered moment, distracting viewers from the consuming influence of civilization, even if only for a moment.’

Cossi di Frutti, http://www.lindasutton.com/

Cossi di Frutti, http://www.lindasutton.com/

We are so delighted to have Linda on board with the trust, and are so excited to see how she approaches our Art on a Ukulele project so please join us to find out more by having a look at our Phundee page and getting involved, and signing up to our mailing list (at the bottom of the page) to receive updates about this project and to find out about our crowdfunding campaign, the rewards we are offering and be part of the process over the next few weeks.

About the Writer

Rosa Torr has a BA in Politics and Philosophy from London currently at University College Dublin. Her place of interest is political theory and in particular Gender Studies. Rosa has written for numerous online publications and the University Observer. She is also a theatre maker and is currently co-artistic director of BUMP&GRIND Theatre Company. The show she co-wrote BUMP will be on at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival this summer.       

Meet Jock Mcfadyen

Here at Art on a Postcard we are incredibly excited to have Jock McFadyen RA, a highly commended British landscape painter, as a contributing artist for out Art on a Ukulele collaboration!
Jock McFadyen RA is a British Painter living and working in London, Edinburgh and France. Born in Scotland Mcfadyen moved to London age 15 to study at Chelsea School of Art where he earned an MA in 1977. Between 1980-2005 he taught at the Slade School of Art and in 1981 he was Artist in Residence at the National Gallery, London. He then set up Grey Gallery which he runs with his wife, violinist Susie Honeyman. 


Jock has stated that his work has taken many stages that occur almost as a reaction to the last. In the 1991 he was commissioned to design the set for Kenneth MacMillan’s last Ballet The Judas Tree at the Royal Opera House and because the dancers were on stage his set featured no people. Since then he has said that his focus on landscapes is due to realising that the people in his paintings were just props ‘a crutch to painting the landscape’. Citing American realist film as an influence, his style is a wonderful blend of photographic realism and his own unique ability to paint the magic and humour lurking within ordinary modern life landscapes with a distinctive painterly style.

McFadyen's studio is in London Fields. Identifying himself as a landscape painter, Jock has always painted from his immediate surroudings. Claiming Whistler and Lowry as his main inspirations, Mcfayden's work echoes their themes and styles. The first pictures to emerge in the 1980s from Jock's studio were populated by the 'waifs and strays of pre Canary Wharf London'. Since, he has lived in the East End and his work has consequently taken a mainly urban tone since. 

On his urban landscape subject matter; Jock says;

 'When I was a student at Chelsea in the 70s, the previous generation were the pop artists and my work was quite stark and self referential. But when I became an artist in Residence at the National Gallery in 1981, I realised I couldn't spend my life just making art about art, so I started painting what I saw on the street - what could be less fashionable? If you are a landscape painter, you can only paint one place at a time. So the question is, are you an East End painter, or are you just a landscape painter that happens to live here?'

Jock has had over 40 solo exhibitions, and his work is held by over 30 public collectors, as well as private and public collections. He was elected a Royal Academician of the Royal Academy of the Arts in 2012 - we couldn't be more thrilled to have him participate in our Ukulele project!

http://www.jockmcfadyen.com

http://www.jockmcfadyen.com

We are so delighted to have Jock on board with the trust, and are so excited to see how he approaches our Art on a Ukulele project so please join us to find out more by having a look at our Phundee page and getting involved, and signing up to our mailing list (at the bottom of the page) to receive updates about this project and to find out about our crowdfunding campaign, the rewards we are offering and be part of the process over the next few weeks.

 

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Meet the Writer

Claudia has written for various publications including GQ and LOVE magazine. She graduated from the University of Leeds in 2014 with a 2:1 Geography and has since gone on to pursue a career in fashion, and is a full time model with Storm London. A keen writer and fashion enthusiast; her secret project 'ClaudRobe' will be launching later this Summer.

Meet Tooney Phillips

Here at Art on a Postcard we are to delighted to have Tooney Phillips as one of our Artists for our Art on a Ukulele project. Tooney started out her career studying architecture at Manchester University and UCL. She then developed her work further by studying fine art at City and Guilds of London Art School (2008–10), where she was awarded the Norman Ackroyd Prize for Etching (2010). Norman is another one of the Artists working on our project! 

Her initial interest in architectural structure certainly influences her work, though as an artist Tooney felt she could explore a more complex perception of form and space in which a tension exists between solid and void. Main sources of her work are the medieval villages of France and Spain, and the limestone quarries of Provence, which are strongly geometric in character. Her elegant etchings and drawings often require as minimal, careful lines and shapes as possible to represent structure and division and to explore where perception meets the physical structures around us. 

In her series Pueblo Blanco, Tooney explores the 'White Towns' of Andalusia in Spain. All of the villages are characterised by whitewashed walls and red or brown tiled roofs. Using a range of mediums she explores the structure of the landscape. In the etchings, Tooney creates a sense of weighty meatiness, despite the tentative and fine lines in which they are engraved. She clearly has a strong sense of the skeletons of buildings, but builds upon them with a sensitive touch, examining how light falls upon them and what this does to our perception. Her work therefore creates a balance between being strong and being delicate, not bias to either. In that way it defies binary scales, being neither masculine nor feminine. As the grey she uses connotes, her work positions itself on a spectrum, providing a special insight into the world around us from someone who knows it as an architect but also feels it as an artist. 

We're so delighted to have Tooney Phillips on board as one of our Artists and can't wait to see what she does with one of our Ukes. Please join us to find out more and know how you can get involved by visiting our Phundee page here or by signing up to our mailing list (at the bottom of the page) to receive updates about this project and to find out about our crowdfunding campaign, the rewards we are offering and be part of the process over the next few months. 

 

                                                                                   About the Writer

Rosa Torr has a BA in Politics and Philosophy from London currently at University College Dublin. Her place of interest is political theory and in particular Gender Studies. Rosa has written for numerous online publications and the University Observer. She is also a theatre maker and is currently co-artistic director of BUMP&GRIND Theatre Company. The show she co-wrote BUMP will be on at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival this summer.                                                                                                                                                                                                 

Meet George Underwood

We're very excited to reveal our behind the scene footage of George Underwood creating his piece for Art on a Ukulele. 

George Underwood is known for his album covers from the 1970’s, in particular works for T Rex, Procol Harum and of course his lifelong friend David Bowie. In fact, George is notoriously man responsible for David Bowie’s iconic different eye colours as a result of a scrap over a girl. George was originally a musician, getting signed before Bowie by Mickie Most. However, at 19 his drink was spiked with LSD causing a mental breakdown. This turn began what would become a lifetime career in surreal illustration. Underwood utilises mythical themes, celebrities and figures of the imagination as subjects for his often nightmarish and always dreamlike illustrations. His iconic long faced figures repeat into infinity against rich jet black back grounds, and smooth shapes swoop around the head of a regal looking woman to form a fairy tale crown- Underwood's pieces create gentle creases between reality and the mythical realm. 

George’s works have been exhibited at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition. In his more recent works George has focused on angels. He sent some pieces to Bowie who said ‘‘God, they made me cry!’. Since Bowie died, George has returned to painting angels.

Take a look at George creating his beautiful piece from his studio. We couldn't be more delighted to have him on board. 

Please join us to find out more and know how you can get involved by visiting our Phundee page here or by signing up to our mailing list (at the bottom of the page) to receive updates about this project and to find out about our crowdfunding campaign, the rewards we are offering and be part of the process over the next few months.    

Meet David Mach RA

Here at Art on a Postcard we are delighted to have David Mach RA as one of our Artists participating in our Art on a Ukulele project. David is a Scottish mixed media artist known most for his work installation pieces and sculptures. He graduated from the Royal Academy of Art in London in 1982 and has since exhibited worldwide. Following several solo shows and public installations, he was nominated for the Turner Prize in 1998. Since 2000 he has worked as the Professor of Sculpture at the Royal Academy of Arts. David’s work is unapologetic, visceral and bold, the Scotsman described his work as ‘big on gesture and big in proportion, it demands your attention and gets it’. He uses a range of mass-produced objects including match sticks, coat hangers, pins, newspapers and postcards to achieve his awe-inspiring pieces.

http://www.davidmach.com/

http://www.davidmach.com/

David’s work seizes you and commands you to look. Giant gorillas made of coat hangers, double sized female figures made out of dominos, 6000 tyres made into a submarine, his work is never subtle and nor does it want to be. It is work that forces you to feel and bowls you over with its presence. When asked what he wants people to get from his work David says that he wishes it to be ‘mentally stimulating in some way. To get the heart racing and the hairs standing on the back of your neck.’  

http://www.davidmach.com/

http://www.davidmach.com/

Devil Head

Devil Head

Devil Head - Burned http://www.davidmach.com/

Devil Head - Burned

http://www.davidmach.com/

David has worked a lot with matchsticks, often creating busts of famous figures. The nature of this material is that these delicate pieces maintain a sense of self-destruction and a lingering danger. David sold his first one to an art dealer in the 80’s, who accidentally set it alight when he was cleaning it. Distressed and panicked he called David who arrived to find it burnt still maintaining its shape. He says that after this he knew that these heads are performance pieces, in a sense they are part of a process of creation going from burning potential to a ball of flames to a waste ground where destruction had taken place. Given this, David decided to set a bust of the devil alight outside in public, creating a spectacle of a stagnant art piece. He describes the ‘flames licking the form of the face’ in a ‘ferocious act of creating’.

Similarly his installation is always epic in message, size and feeling. In his 2017 London exhibition Mach created an improvised piece from 20,000 tonnes of newspapers and a Jeep. David is very much a part of the building process, willing to put in the graft and get down and dirty with his materials, standing back and improvising with them. In this piece, the paper creates waves rising high above the viewer and a jeep cascades down it in mid-motion as though it has crashed through the ceiling. There is a consciousness to this piece that relates to the environment and human destruction, of the physical rolling over the intellectual. But it doesn’t wait for you to intellectualise it, he wants you to feel it.

http://www.davidmach.com/

http://www.davidmach.com/

For an artist who likes to grab the attention of the viewer it follows that he should take to the public space as often as David does. The Big Heids in Glasgow and Out of Order in Kingston have become part of both communities, whether they perplex, confuse, or inspire the viewer, you can’t ignore them. As an artist he is unafraid and works as though limits are futile, only holding back to a point. It is most definitely an expression of himself and he says ‘if you’re gonna do it, do it right, you know?’. He also swears a lot but jokingly insists he is a very polite person, but not too polite that it’s going to hold him back. He is self-aware and knows what he wants from his pieces, what is it that he likes about his work most? ‘It seems to be irritating’ he says with a smile.

We’re extremely excited to see in what innovative manner David Mach approaches our Art on a Ukulele project so please join us to find out more and how you can be a part of it by visiting our Phundee page here and by signing up to our mailing list (at the bottom of the page) to receive updates about this project and to find out about our crowdfunding campaign, the rewards we are offering and be part of the process over the next few months.

                                                                                    About the Writer

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Rosa Torr is a final year BA Politics and Philosophy student from London currently at University College Dublin. Her place of interest is political theory and in particular Gender Studies. Rosa has written for numerous online publications and the University Observer. She is also a theatre maker and is currently co-artistic director of BUMP&GRIND Theatre Company. The show she co-wrote BUMP will be on at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival this summer.